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April 19, 2014 10:11 pm April 18, 2014 2:44 am

First year teachers, do you ever feel like you’re going to have to redo EVERYTHING for next year?

florastar:

math-girl:

Sometimes, I feel like my lessons, sequencing, and resources for the kids are crap this year.

They’re learning, don’t get me wrong… but I’m hoping I’ll be a thousand times better at this next year.

Absolutely.. About a month in I had how next august will go all planned. From one first year to another.

April 14, 2014 9:25 pm
"It is a lonely feeling when someone you care about becomes a stranger."

Lemony Snicket, When Did You See Her Last?  (via hommesclub)

(Source: durianseeds, via wackyadventure)

9:11 pm 9:10 pm

Had my final observation today.

and it could not feel better.
It wasn’t a very exciting day, we were just reviewing for our unit test tomorrow, but he had good things to say in his scripting. He complimented my classroom environment. My students were really great, although this class usually is just exceptional in the morning, so they were on point today as well. They were asking the right questions, working perfectly individually and when it was group work time they were on task and not ridiculously loud. He mentioned that he was impressed when the phone rang a specific student knew to get up and quietly answer it if i was busy, she’s also a spectacular student and knows to take care of whatever the caller needs without interrupting me. (unless she has to)

So, needless to say, I’m quite happy that he enjoyed being in my class (it was his first time all year, the other observations have been done by my A.P)  I’m ready for the post-observation conferences so I can officially be done with that mess this year and see what my official scores are. And hopefully next year I won’t need 4 observations.

The year is winding down and I’m already focused on next year and getting things together for that, whatever I may be teaching. I’m itching to know. I really hope it’s just science, my life will be much easier. I’m also anxious to know if I”m getting into grad school or not. They’re just not in a hurry to let anyone know. Although, one of the professors did email my science partner and asked about me, so that’s a plus. She let me read the emails and it looks promising. I just really hope I don’t miss out on a free Masters degree from Vanderbilt. So, tumblr community, please keep your fingers crossed for me.

/end ramble.

April 13, 2014 11:04 pm
"Don’t ever compliment me by insulting other women. That’s not a compliment, it’s a competition none of us agreed to."

jaythenerdkid (via escapedgoat)

"it’s a competition none of us agreed to"  I want to give the author of this quote the hardest dap ever. 

(via dynastylnoire)

(via quixoticandabsurd)

11:04 pm
melodiebenford:

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect
In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.
So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.
Continue Reading

Our unsung heros that contribute just as much to science as the PI. The lab assistant, the cataloguer, the person who takes data. Many times they contribute to the IP, help work through troubleshooting and maintaining lab equipment. It takes a village to make significant breakthroughs in science.

melodiebenford:

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect

In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.

So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.

Continue Reading

Our unsung heros that contribute just as much to science as the PI. The lab assistant, the cataloguer, the person who takes data. Many times they contribute to the IP, help work through troubleshooting and maintaining lab equipment. It takes a village to make significant breakthroughs in science.

(via quixoticandabsurd)

11:04 pm

And when I need you, I need it quickly. In fact you’ll never know.

10:48 pm
Bought 80 pencils today for my classroom ($5.00 worth).

ambedu:

firstyearteacherproblems:

ambedu:

ambedu:

spaghettimaestra:

ambedu:

Wanna take bets on how many weeks that will last?

I see 133 sixth graders every day.

This is why I bought a box of golf pencils for my students to use.

I saw those at Staples. Might be a good idea for next year!

Since I teach writing, my main…

I also teach writing and it’s a double edged sword with supplying pencils/pens for students to use. On one hand they need them to complete the classwork so you feel forced to supply them, but other hand  you don’t want to do that so the kids learn some responsibility. If I’m honest about my students though, if I didn’t supply them half of my class would sit there and willingly fail because of something as stupid as not having a pen. 

This is exactly how I feel. Especially at this part of the year.

I just started telling them I don’t have pencils. They seem to return them to their peers better than they returned them to me. Somehow I don’t get asked for pencils anymore…

10:42 pm
"I dunno, just laying face down on the couch and waiting for some baby boomers to die, I guess"

Millennials, when asked about plans for the future (via alwaysfaithfulterriblelizard)

(Source: hermione-ganja, via iamlittlei)